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Journal of archaeology and ancient architecture

Tag Archives: Apulia

La “romanizzazione” dell’Italía ionica: nuovi dati

Authors: L. Lepore, C. Giatti, M. Gras, G. Bejor, R. Belli Pasqua

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On March 15, 2019, at the University of Florence, took place the presentation of the Proceedings of the meeting “La romanizzazione dell’ Italía ionica. Aspetti e problemi ” edited by L. Lepore and C. Giatti, including an extensive chronicle of the two study days and twelve contributions on the cities and centers of Apulia, Lucania and Bruzio. On that occasion, Michel Gras, Giorgio Bejor and Roberta Belli Pasqua presented the Proceedings, focusing their contributions respectively on rural areas, urban realities, archaeological contexts. Given the particular character of the event, conducted and held in such an unconventional way, it was deemed appropriate to publish the texts of the three contributions – in their original form – to be read, if desired, as critical comments.

 

 

(Italiano) Arredo urbano e rappresentatività pubblica e privata: il caso dell’Apulia meridionale in età tardo repubblicana e imperiale

Author: R. Belli Pasqua

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The study investigates the Roman sculpture from Taranto, Lecce and Brindisi; although in many cases it is difficult to trace the pertaining original contexts, the preserved documentation allows us to analyze how the sculptural decoration was used to meet the needs of public and private representativeness. The ideal sculptures, realized in function of the great monumental complexes built starting from the Augustan age (celebratory complexes, theaters, thermae, amphitheaters), show the adhesion to the political and cultural guidelines enacted at central level, while the iconic statuary documents the choice of public areas or highly representative buildings, aimed at building consent, so as to create those “figurative spaces” through which the city celebrates itself and its citizens. Iconographic schemes and reference models attest the full adherence to the cultural models proposed by the imperial authority.